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Thread: Xanex and ammunition..

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    Super Moderator LivinLOS's Avatar
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    Xanex and ammunition..

    To cover the issues of social order events and outcomes, relating to economic issues... This is a better home than jamming it all into the bubbles threads..

    It gives me no pleasure, in fact a large dose of fear, to start the thread off with this NYT piece.

    http://www.nytimes.com/2013/04/18/wo...smid=tw-share&

    More Children in Greece Are Going Hungry

    Angelos Tzortzinis for The International Herald Tribune



    Michalis Petrakis, who is jobless and whose son Pantelis has been going to school hungry, shows his nearly empty refrigerator.


    ATHENS — As an elementary school principal, Leonidas Nikas is used to seeing children play, laugh and dream about the future. But recently he has seen something altogether different, something he thought was impossible in Greece: children picking through school trash cans for food; needy youngsters asking playmates for leftovers; and an 11-year-old boy, Pantelis Petrakis, bent over with hunger pains.

    He had eaten almost nothing at home,” Mr. Nikas said, sitting in his cramped school office near the port of Piraeus, a working-class suburb of Athens, as the sound of a jump rope skittered across the playground. He confronted Pantelis’s parents, who were ashamed and embarrassed but admitted that they had not been able to find work for months. Their savings were gone, and they were living on rations of pasta and ketchup.

    “Not in my wildest dreams would I expect to see the situation we are in,” Mr. Nikas said. “We have reached a point where children in Greece are coming to school hungry. Today, families have difficulties not only of employment, but of survival.”

    The Greek economy is in free fall, having shrunk by 20 percent in the past five years. The unemployment rate is more than 27 percent, the highest in Europe, and 6 of 10 job seekers say they have not worked in more than a year. Those dry statistics are reshaping the lives of Greek families with children, more of whom are arriving at schools hungry or underfed, even malnourished, according to private groups and the government itself.

    Last year, an estimated 10 percent of Greek elementary and middle school students suffered from what public health professionals call “food insecurity,” meaning they faced hunger or the risk of it, said Dr. Athena Linos, a professor at the University of Athens Medical School who also heads a food assistance program at Prolepsis, a nongovernmental public health group that has studied the situation. “When it comes to food insecurity, Greece has now fallen to the level of some African countries,” she said.

    Unlike those in the United States, Greek schools do not offer subsidized cafeteria lunches. Students bring their own food or buy items from a canteen. The cost has become insurmountable for some families with little or no income. Their troubles have been compounded by new austerity measures demanded by Greece’s creditors, including higher electricity taxes and cuts in subsidies for large families. As a result, parents without work are seeing their savings and benefits rapidly disappear.

    “All around me I hear kids saying: ‘My parents don’t have any money. We don’t know what we are going to do,’ ” said Evangelia Karakaxa, a vivacious 15-year-old at the No. 9 junior high school in Acharnes.

    Acharnes, a working-class town among the mountains of Attica, was bustling with activity from imports until the economic crisis wiped out thousands of factory jobs.

    Now, several of Evangelia’s classmates are frequently hungry, she said, and one boy recently fainted. Some children were starting to steal for food, she added. While she does not excuse it, she understands their plight. “Those who are well fed will never understand those who are not,” she said.

    “Our dreams are crushed,” added Evangelia, whose parents are unemployed but who is not in the same dire situation as her peers. She paused, then continued in a low voice. “They say that when you drown, your life flashes before your eyes. My sense is that in Greece, we are drowning on dry land.”

    Alexandra Perri, who works at the school, said that at least 60 of the 280 students suffered from malnutrition. Children who once boasted of sweets and meat now talk of eating boiled macaroni, lentils, rice or potatoes. “The cheapest stuff,” Ms. Perri said.

    This year the number of malnutrition cases jumped. “A year ago, it wasn’t like this,” Ms. Perri, said, fighting back tears. “What’s frightening is the speed at which it is happening.”

    The government, which initially dismissed the reports as exaggerations, recently acknowledged that it needed to tackle the issue of malnutrition in schools. But with priorities placed on repaying bailout funds, there is little money in Greek coffers to cope.

    Mr. Nikas, the principal, said he knew that the Greek government was laboring to fix the economy. Now that talk of Greece’s exiting the euro zone has disappeared, things look better to the outside world. “But tell that to the family of Pantelis,” he said. “They don’t feel the improvement in their lives.”

    In the family’s darkened apartment near the school, Themelina Petrakis, Pantelis’s mother, opened her refrigerator and cupboards one recent weekend. Inside was little more than a few bottles of ketchup and other condiments, some macaroni and leftovers from a meal she had gotten from the town hall.

    The family was doing well and was even helping others in need until last year. The Petrakises were able to afford a spacious apartment with a flat-screen TV and a PlayStation.

    Then her husband, Michalis, 41, was laid off from his shipping job in December. He said the company had not paid his wages for five months before that. The couple could no longer afford rent, and by February they had run out of money.

    “When the principal called, I had to tell him, ‘We don’t have food,’ ” said Ms. Petrakis, 36, cradling Pantelis’s head as he cast his eyes to the ground.

    Mr. Petrakis said he felt emasculated after repeatedly failing to find new work. When food for the family ran low, he stopped eating almost entirely, and rapidly lost weight.

    “When I was working last summer, I even threw away excess bread,” he said, tears streaming down his face. “Now, I sit here with a war running through my head, trying to figure out how we will live.”

    When the hunger comes, Ms. Petrakis has a solution. “It’s simple,” she said. “You get hungry, you get dizzy and you sleep it off.”

    A 2012 Unicef report showed that among the poorest Greek households with children, more than 26 percent had an “economically weak diet.” The phenomenon has hit immigrants hardest but is spreading quickly among Greeks in urban areas where one or both parents are effectively permanently unemployed.

    In rural areas, people can at least grow food. But that is not enough to eradicate the problem. An hour’s drive northwest of Athens, in the industrial town of Asproprigos, Nicos Tsoufar, 42, stared vacantly ahead as he sat in the middle school that his three children attend. The school receives lunches from a program run by Prolepsis, the public health group. Mr. Tsoufar said his children desperately needed the meals.

    He has not found work for three years. Now, he said, his family is living on what he called a “cabbage-based diet,” which it supplements by foraging for snails in nearby fields. “I know you can’t cover nutritional basics with cabbage,” he said bitterly. “But there’s no alternative.”

    The government and groups like Prolepsis are doing what they can. Last year, Prolepsis started a pilot program providing a sandwich, fruit and milk at 34 public schools where more than half of the 6,400 families participating said they had experienced “medium to serious hunger.”

    After the program, that percentage dropped to 41 percent. Financed by an $8 million grant from the Stavros Niarchos Foundation, an international philanthropic organization, the program was expanded this year to cover 20,000 children at 120 schools.

    Konstantinos Arvanitopoulos, Greece’s education minister, said the government had secured European Union financing to provide fruit and milk in schools, and vouchers for bread and cheese. It is also working with the Greek Orthodox Church to provide thousands of care packages. “It is the least we can do in this difficult financial circumstance,” he said.

    Mr. Nikas, the principal at 11-year-old Pantelis’s school, has taken matters into his own hands and is organizing food drives at the school. He is angry at what he sees as broader neglect of Greece’s troubles by Europe.

    “I’m not saying we should just wait for others to help us,” he said. “But unless the European Union acts like this school, where families help other families because we’re one big family, we’re done for.”
    50% youth unemployment.. From Greece to Cyprus to Spain and potentially Portugal and even 'wealthy' italy if contagion escapes.. Is a powderkeg for social unrest.. Hungry people are dangerous people.

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    Re: Xanex and ammunition..

    Greece is in a bad place, Spain seems very bad as well. I don't understand the economics that well but it's hard to understand why they don't ditch the Euro and go back to their own currency.

    Ireland is still in a bad way as well. Lots of people there with big mortgages they can't pay.

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    Senior Member marc26's Avatar
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    Re: Xanex and ammunition..

    Quote Originally Posted by LivinLOS View Post
    To cover the issues of social order events and outcomes, relating to economic issues... This is a better home than jamming it all into the bubbles threads..

    It gives me no pleasure, in fact a large dose of fear, to start the thread off with this NYT piece.


    50% youth unemployment.. From Greece to Cyprus to Spain and potentially Portugal and even 'wealthy' italy if contagion escapes.. Is a powderkeg for social unrest.. Hungry people are dangerous people.
    I am not downplaying it
    but........you literally could replace that story with every inner city school in the US that has been happening for the last 20years
    my ex-gf was a teacher in the hood and she basically the only time the kids really ate was when they were in school

    like, literally could replace Greece with Park Hill Staten Island
    now, as they alluded to in the story, if the schools/govt doesn't have the money to provide some support.......that is key

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    Re: Xanex and ammunition..

    Quote Originally Posted by marc26 View Post


    I am not downplaying it
    but........you literally could replace that story with every inner city school in the US that has been happening for the last 20years
    my ex-gf was a teacher in the hood and she basically the only time the kids really ate was when they were in school

    like, literally could replace Greece with Park Hill Staten Island
    now, as they alluded to in the story, if the schools/govt doesn't have the money to provide some support.......that is key
    That's not the USA that we see from the outside looking in, surprising to think it's that bad over there.

    I think Europe has had a new reality dawn on them. It will be social changes that we haven't seen in a few generations, kids living with parents for half their lives etc. and not much state aid.

    For me, the whole Euro concept is holed below the waterline and normal people are paying the price for it.

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    Super Moderator LivinLOS's Avatar
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    Re: Xanex and ammunition..

    Quote Originally Posted by Steve@thaib View Post

    For me, the whole Euro concept is holed below the waterline and normal people are paying the price for it.
    My 2 Euro cents..

    Theres nothing wrong with a trading bloc.. With a free trade and economic mobility etc area.. But once you centralize power and it becomes non democratic leadership, theres too much that can go wrong.

    As for the single currency.. Doomed.. Tho Kevs still got 2 years and a couple of months left in his bet..

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    Re: Xanex and ammunition..

    2 years ... I thought I said 2014 ... where the chit? 5555
    Its My Life .....!

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    Super Moderator LivinLOS's Avatar
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    Re: Xanex and ammunition..

    Quote Originally Posted by K2 View Post
    2 years ... I thought I said 2014 ... where the chit? 5555
    I was sure it was 3 years.. But unsure when in the summertime it was..

    Call it June..

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    Re: Xanex and ammunition..

    Gonna be close run thing then ... think 2-13 safe enough ... H1 2014 probably ok too... there after ... tough.
    Its My Life .....!

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    Member IamMike's Avatar
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    Very sad story to read. In most crises the children are often badly affected. But i don`t think that europe
    and in special spain and greece in general are breadthways so poor. If you look at the just shown ezb-study
    (european central bank), it looks not so harsh.

    Accordingly to the 2013 study the middle property of a greek household is 101 900 Euro, in Spain 182 700 Euro
    and in Cypress 266 900 Euro.

    There are some critics on that study. It`s a household, they are in Europe in different size. They also took
    private houses of ones own use in that calculation and used prices from 2010 and 2008. Also there are other
    studys for example from credit suisse that show slightly different findings with a different statistic setting.

    But there is still property, not only for a few. In my sight those who have, should be involved more in
    helping the poor kids.

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    Quote Originally Posted by LivinLOS View Post
    My 2 Euro cents..

    Theres nothing wrong with a trading bloc.. With a free trade and economic mobility etc area.. But once you centralize power and it becomes non democratic leadership, theres too much that can go wrong.

    As for the single currency.. Doomed.. Tho Kevs still got 2 years and a couple of months left in his bet..
    I never understood the clamour to join the Euro, just couldn't see how the same interest rates and exchange rates could work for such different countries. I don't know how they sold it, politically, to populations across Europe but fortunately we all remembered just what a shafting we got with decimalisation and we were never going to fall for it twice.

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    Senior Member Waharoa's Avatar
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    Could almost have it's own thread...

    How are humans going to become extinct?



    What are the greatest global threats to humanity?

    Are we on the verge of our own unexpected extinction?

    An international team of scientists, mathematicians and philosophers at Oxford University's Future of Humanity Institute is investigating the biggest dangers.

    And they argue in a research paper, Existential Risk as a Global Priority, that international policymakers must pay serious attention to the reality of species-obliterating risks.

    Last year there were more academic papers published on snowboarding than human extinction.

    The Swedish-born director of the institute, Nick Bostrom, says the stakes couldn't be higher. If we get it wrong, this could be humanity's final century.

    Been there, survived it

    So what are the greatest dangers?
    ....there is a real gap between the speed of technological advance and our understanding of its implications."We're at the level of infants in moral responsibility, but with the technological capability of adults," he says.

    As such, the significance of existential risk is "not on people's radars".

    But he argues that change is coming whether or not we're ready for it.

    "There is a bottleneck in human history. The human condition is going to change. It could be that we end in a catastrophe or that we are transformed by taking much greater control over our biology.

    "It's not science fiction, religious doctrine or a late-night conversation in the pub.

    "There is no plausible moral case not to take it seriously."

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    Euro Unity was always going to be a balancing act between the haves and the have nots.
    An economic growth model requires more and more new players at the lowest levels to create "Wealth" for those with capital invested in it for longer.
    Just seems like large numbers of people living at low socio economic subsistence levels for long periods of time has become the norm. The former middle class wealth is being dissipated as they are living so much longer and coping with the age demographic spike we all knew was there. A Europe without a "New world" to pillage has turned out to be a weak one.

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    Sounds like an Lil philosophy...

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    K2
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    Quote Originally Posted by K2 View Post
    Gonna be close run thing then ... think 2-13 safe enough ... H1 2014 probably ok too... there after ... tough.
    Maybe I'll be OK ...

    Euro may only last five years, says senior German government advisor - Telegraph

    ... only so much Germany will put up with and when it's not in their interest its game over ... Italy Gov debt now under 4% over Germany ... thats crazy given they have no Government, an octagenarian president ... (but lots of gold).
    Its My Life .....!

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    Never forget what a good dollop of regional xenophobia can do to mix things up..

    It is becoming increasingly evident that Japan is attempting to use monetary policy to paper over the cracks of imploding foreign policy decisions. The 'storm in a teacup' that has brought China and Japan into fierce rhetorical battles over the Senkaku (or Diaoyu) Islands is having far more deep-seated impacts on the people of the two nations - and implicitly their buying habits. Unfortunately for the embattled Japanese - they are the ones in need far more than vice versa. As Bloomberg reports, discrimination against Japanese is increasingly common in China, as the head of China's Honda plant notes, he’s "never worked in a more hostile place." The dispute over the islands is raising resentment with bars and restaurants showings signs at the door saying, 'Japanese are barred from entering.' "Wherever I go, like department stores or in taxis, people ask me whether I am Japanese," and the reaction can be frosty. Simply put, no matter how cheap the Japanese make their cars by explicitly devaluing their currency, the largest auto market in the world (that of the Chinese) will not be buying; summed up rather bleakly, "I don’t really care about [car] brands,... but there are cars I won’t buy -- the Japanese ones. The reason is simple: Diaoyu."



    A sign suggesting no entry for “Japanese” is seen on a notice board posted outside Feng Bo Zhuang diner in Wuhan, Hubei province on April 22, 2013. Asked about the sign, “My boss thinks the Japanese are way wrong on the Diaoyu islands issues, so he decided to put up the sign,” said a manager dressed in a Kung Fu master’s outfit who identified himself only by his family name, Zhong. “It’s also our way of marketing, because Chinese people were all angry.”
    Open Prejudice Shows Depth of Toyota?s Slump in China - Bloomberg

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    Super Moderator LivinLOS's Avatar
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    The Biggest Price-Fixing Scandal Ever | Politics News | Rolling Stone

    Everything Is Rigged: The Biggest Price-Fixing Scandal Ever
    The Illuminati were amateurs. The second huge financial scandal of the year reveals the real international conspiracy: There's no price the big banks can't fix

  17. #17
    Senior Member Waharoa's Avatar
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    ^Depressing reading... thanks Lil... 555

  18. #18
    Super Moderator LivinLOS's Avatar
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    Hows those gun sales going ??





    I wish I could find a xanex shipped per 1/4er chart..

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    Where are the militant starved poor going to get their guns - from robbing the rich?

    Wealth re-distribution 101

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    Won't matter much Baz...The government has bought up all the ammo...555

    Congressmen Demand Answers From DHS On 1.6 Billion Bullet Purchase - Investors.com

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