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Thread: Election stuff

  1. #1
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    Election stuff

    The town was pretty quiet the past couple of nights. Still some action to be found around Street 51. The Heart of Darkness was open last night as well as a bar or two on 136 and 104.
    IMG_5277.jpgIMG_5233.jpgIMG_5244.jpgIMG_5250.jpgIMG_5251.jpg
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    Rubbish is bad there - is there any collection service/street cleaning?

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    Collection goes on hold around voting or major holidays that see the masses go back to their provinces. Piles get pretty high at times and the rats have a field day.

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    Senior Member kaptainrob's Avatar
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    Nice photos Jim, what is the camera model?

    My night-time pics along Sisowath Quay didn't amount to much using an IXUS.
    Cheers, Rob.

  7. #7
    Senior Member NeedHoliday's Avatar
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    What's the deal with the elections? Who do we want to win? I loved the enthusiasm I saw a few weeks back, they were really supporting one of the parties in PP - I just didn't know which!

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    Rob, I had a 50d and found that the I really couldnt go beyond 3200 iso so bought a Canon 5d Mark 2 and a few fast lenses. I could go to 6400 with that, but the Mark 3 and 6d came out and the high iso stuff from them is fantastic. I ended up getting the 6d as it was a grand cheaper. I have also found that the 24mm and 50 mm 1.2 could stay home more as the 6d could handle the 2.8 lenses almost as good. The shots here were taken with the 6d and a 24-70mm 2.8 at anywhere from 3200-25000 iso. No tripods just hand held. I shoot TV as I shake a lot and try to keep the shutter a speed that I know I can manage and move the iso up and down to accommodate.

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    chicken feet.jpg
    Nothing says things are getting back to normal here, than girls on their phones eating chicken feet on the street at 345 am
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  10. #10
    Super Moderator LivinLOS's Avatar
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    Both sides claim victory in Cambodia?s murky elections - Asia - World - The Independent

    Just when you think its all over bar the shouting.. Along comes some shouting !!

  11. #11
    Senior Member kaptainrob's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JimCA2 View Post
    Rob, I had a 50d and found that the I really couldnt go beyond 3200 iso so bought a Canon 5d Mark 2 and a few fast lenses. I could go to 6400 with that, but the Mark 3 and 6d came out and the high iso stuff from them is fantastic. I ended up getting the 6d as it was a grand cheaper. I have also found that the 24mm and 50 mm 1.2 could stay home more as the 6d could handle the 2.8 lenses almost as good. The shots here were taken with the 6d and a 24-70mm 2.8 at anywhere from 3200-25000 iso. No tripods just hand held. I shoot TV as I shake a lot and try to keep the shutter a speed that I know I can manage and move the iso up and down to accommodate.
    You could put up your own PP "photo-tour" thread or add to my Angkor one. I particularly like the depth of field and lighting you achieve. Makes photos come to life.
    Cheers, Rob.

  12. #12
    Super Moderator LivinLOS's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kaptainrob View Post
    You could put up your own PP "photo-tour" thread or add to my Angkor one. I particularly like the depth of field and lighting you achieve. Makes photos come to life.
    Jim does a superb series titled nite sniper on facebook.. A balance of nightlife with a hint of social commentary (poverty) in most of the collections.

    Top stuff every time.

  13. #13
    Super Moderator LivinLOS's Avatar
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    Here's the HRW media release, which exposes how the votes were falsified:


    The ruling Cambodian People's Party (CPP) appears to have been involved in electoral fraud in Cambodia's July 28, 2013 national elections, according to residents and ruling party officials interviewed by Human Rights Watch.

    All allegations of election fraud and other irregularities, including bias in the election machinery, should be promptly investigated by an independent commission.

    The CPP-controlled National Election Commission (NEC) released preliminary results showing that the ruling party won 68 seats and the opposition Cambodian National Reconciliation Party (CNRP) won 55.

    Based on the same results, the CPP won approximately 49 percent of the national vote, while the CNRP won approximately 44 percent.

    The opposition has claimed widespread fraud and called for the creation of an independent expert body that includes the United Nations and nongovernmental groups to examine the results and address irregularities.

    ''Senior ruling party officials appear to have been involved in issuing fake election documents and fraudulently registering voters in multiple provinces,'' said Brad Adams, Asia director at Human Rights Watch.

    ''And people from the party seem to have been turning up in places where they clearly don't live and insisting on voting - not to mention the many other claims of fraud around the country.''

    A CPP village chief, who asked for anonymity to protect his security, gave Human Rights Watch an insider's account of how ruling party authorities in his district engaged in electoral fraud by issuing fraudulent 'Identity Certificates for Elections' (ICE) before the July 28 elections.

    The certificates allow people whose names appear on voter registration lists to vote even though they otherwise lack proper identification documents.

    The village chief, whose local CPP superiors worked under instructions from a CPP Center-Level Work Team headed by an army general and a CPP Central Committee member, told Human Rights Watch that his immediate party superiors directly oversaw the illegal issuance of certificates.

    He explained that a member of the general's team gave the instructions to issue certificates in the names of villagers who were on the voter registration rolls but were known either to be dead or to have long left their original homes.

    The work team member allegedly arranged for soldiers and their wives from an army division stationed in the province to be photographed for certificates.
    These were then issued by CPP commune and Interior Ministry officials, who allegedly conspired in the scheme to falsely certify these soldiers and their wives as local residents eligible to vote in the commune where these officials were responsible for voter registration.

    One media report, which is consistent with other accounts, recounted villager descriptions of army-organised voting by thousands of soldiers shipped across provincial boundaries in military vehicles to vote in parts of Siem Reap province where none of them had ever been seen before.

    ''Issuing hundreds of thousands of fake identity certificates was allegedly one of several key ways the ruling party organised large scale election fraud,'' Adams said. ''Now, a CPP village chief has confirmed that this happened in his area.''

    In another case, villagers in Kandal province, adjacent to the capital, Phnom Penh, described to Human Rights Watch efforts by senior CPP officials to vote in more than one place. When confronted by local residents, the party officials threatened them with arrest and later returned and made death threats.

    Numerous residents of Koki Thom commune in Kandal interviewed by Human Rights Watch said that on election day, Ngo Sovan, whose business card states that he is ''minister delegate attached to the prime minister'' and specifies that he is a secretary of state at the Ministry of Justice, arrived in their commune to vote.

    He was accompanied by other members of the party's grassroots strengthening team assigned to the area, as well as by Heng Seksa, whose card says he is a ''deputy secretary-general of the Royal Cambodian Government,'' and an entourage of dozens of government officials from Phnom Penh.

    The villagers protested the group's attempt to vote there, asserting to local electoral authorities that none of the people were local residents.

    The local electoral authorities, whom the villagers described as linked to the ruling party, nevertheless allowed the group to cast ballots.

    Ngo Sovan's team included several national level civil servants. According to the national voter registration list compiled from official data on the National Election Committee website and examined by Human Rights Watch, Ngo Sovan was registered to vote in three places.

    The first (voter registration number R-1424108) is at his known residence in Phnom Penh, where he is a prominent figure and resident, according to local residents Human Rights Watch interviewed.

    Ngo Sovan is also registered in the provinces of Kandal (voter registration number R-6132454) and Svay Rieng (voter registration number R-6851267). He heads ruling party election grassroots strengthening or work teams in both provinces.

    In Kandal, Ngo Sovan also ran as a CPP candidate for the National Assembly.

    Heng Seksa, who accompanied Ngo Sovan in Kandal, was registered to vote in both Phnom Penh (voter registration number R-6354916) and Kandal (voter registration number R-6132299), according to official data from the NEC website.

    Villagers told Human Rights Watch that members of the entourage threatened them with arrest during the confrontation over whether the group's members would be allowed to vote. After polls closed, a contingent of ''flying tiger'' motorcycle police arrived in the area.

    Villagers told Human Rights Watch that the police said they were looking for ''ringleaders'' of the ''disturbances'' that had occurred when the ruling party group's voter registration was challenged.

    The morning after the elections, some members of the group reappeared in the village along with others, including one armed man in civilian clothes, who attempted to identify and apprehend an alleged ''ringleader.''

    Two witnesses told Human Rights Watch that members of the group threatened to kill villagers who refused to provide information on the whereabouts of the alleged ringleader, whom the group also vowed to kill and who has gone into hiding.

    ''The multiple voting scheme suggests the possibility of systematic election fraud by the CPP and raises serious questions about the credibility of the election,'' Adams said.

    ''Since the National Election Committee and local election commissions are under the ruling party's control, influential governments and donors should demand independent investigations into these and other credible allegations of election related irregularities.

    Without this, it's hard to see how Cambodian voters can have confidence in the legitimacy of the elections and the new government that results.''

  14. #14
    Senior Member geir's Avatar
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    Nice......what a great part of the world we live in.....This is why these countries are going nowhere, their own biggest enemies (Thailand, Cambodia, Burma and maybe also Laos).
    A blowjob is better than no job!!

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    Super Moderator LivinLOS's Avatar
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    I really hope that it settles down and its back to normal.. while everyone wants full and fair democracy it's simply a fact that life is cheap in Cambodia and the entrenched power base is unlikely to give up with out a fight. Given their wealth, power, and above the law mindsets, you have to assume blood would be spilt in any attempt to challenge the results.

    No one needs some of the potential outcomes that are sadly imaginable.

  16. #16
    Senior Member geir's Avatar
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    are you there at the moment?? Does people seem nervous about the situation, or is it a bit like the "mai pen rai" Thai mentality??
    A blowjob is better than no job!!

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    Super Moderator LivinLOS's Avatar
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    No I am not there..

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    There is a sense of and undercurrent of fear despite the city returning to normal. A lot of traffic back on the streets. Nightlife venues starting to tick over again.

  19. #19
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    Rainsy Says Large Demonstrations Await Unless CPP Concedes | The Cambodia Daily

    Rainsy Says Large Demonstrations Await Unless CPP Concedes
    By Aun Pheap and Zsombor Peter - August 7, 2013

    Reiterating his claim of winning last month’s disputed national election, opposition leader Sam Rainsy told thousands of supporters in Phnom Penh on Tuesday to prepare for a mass demonstration against the ruling CPP unless its leaders stepped down.

    Addressing an excited crowd of more than 5,000 fans at Freedom Park, Mr. Rainsy made little mention of the investigation he had been calling for into reports of widespread voting irregularities and said the time had come for the CPP to simply accept defeat.

    Opposition leaders Sam Rainsy and Kem Sokha greet supporters at Freedom Park in Phnom Penh on Tuesday. (Siv Channa)

    “We don’t want to hold a demonstration, so I want to send a message to the [CPP],” Mr. Rainsy told the noisy crowd. “It must find an appropriate solution for the CNRP. If they don’t want a demonstration to happen, they must inform the U.N. that they lost and we will accept it after they step down.”

    With official results still pending, both parties say they won a majority of the National Assembly’s 123 seats in the July 28 poll and with them the right to form the next government.

    Negotiations to form a bipartisan committee to investigate voting irregularities broke down Saturday when the CPP said it would not let the U.N. play a role and the CNRP refused to participate without them.

    Unless the CPP now concedes, Mr. Rainsy said, “We will prepare a big demonstration, more than 10 times the people [here] today. We must stand up to protect our result.”

    To peels of laughter, the CNRP president pointed out that even by the CPP’s unofficial figures, Prime Minister Hun Sen, Senate President Chea Sim and National Assembly President Heng Samrin, all CPP top brass, saw the CNRP win the majority of seats in their provinces.

    “Chea Sim stood in Phnom Penh, but he lost to the CNRP. Hun Sen stood in Kandal prov*ince, but he lost to the CNRP. Heng Samrin stood in Kompong Cham, but he lost to the CNRP,” Mr. Rainsy said. “No one believes that the CPP won.”

    Taking over from Mr. Rainsy, CNRP vice president Kem Sokha claimed that the opposition had even won the majority of votes among soldiers and civil servants, who have traditionally supported the CPP thanks to a well-entrenched system of patronage and nepotism.

    “According to research from CNRP officials, more than 70 percent of the armed forces and civil servants voted for the CNRP,” he said.

    “I believe that civil servants and the armed forces, even the market vendors and businessmen, voted for the CNRP.”

    “A senior CPP official text messaged to me that he also supports the CNRP and that he wants to change the leadership,” Mr. Sokha claimed without naming the official.

    Offering government employees something of an olive branch, Mr. Sokha assured them that the CNRP would not usher in a wave of firings once in power.

    “After the CPP announces it has lost, the CNRP will welcome and work with government officials to build the country together,” he said.

    Contacted afterward, Royal Cambodian Armed Forces Commander-in-Chief Pol Saroeun declined to comment on Mr. Sokha’s claim that the opposition took the majority of army votes. “I don’t know. If Mr. Sam Rainsy said so, you can use his comment,” he said.

    Council of Ministers spokesman Phay Siphan said the opposition could not possibly know who they voted for. “It’s not true because Sam Rainsy doesn’t have evidence and the election is a secret, so no one knows who voted for which political party,” he said.

    Back at the rally, CNRP supporters said they were ready to heed their leaders’ call for a mass demonstration.

    Yun Chenla, a third-year agricultural sciences student who was still chanting the opposition slogan “change” on his own well after Mr. Rainsy had left the stage, said he was ready to take to the streets.

    “I’m ready to join the demonstration if they need us to,” he said. “I have Khmer blood, so I know there are many problems across the country.”

    Mr. Hun Sen has recently warned the CNRP that any pro*tests would be met with counter-protests by the CPP and that any violence that ensued would be the opposition’s fault.

  20. #20
    Senior Member WarProfiteer's Avatar
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    I have a(nother) upcoming visa run to PP and last night a buddy sent me news stories of how the military has now quite visibly rolled armored personnel carriers into some parts of the city. My trip is either 2 weeks or 4 weeks away (depending on how many overland border runs I feel like making) and I figure the more time given, the better. As Sef said, the people in power are not likely to give it up without a fight... that worries me.

    Hope all is OK Jim... I'm sure I'll see ya when I'm next there. Stay safe...

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