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Thread: D-Day

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    D-Day

    Today is the anniversary of D-Day - the Invasion of Normandy - 6th of June 1944 - and a turning point in the WW2 and the restoration of democracy to Europe.

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    Senior Member slampay's Avatar
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    Yay America!

    Did Australia watch it live? Or on tape delay?


    Jk..... Great day for freedom, the sacrifices of that day are truely awe inspiring.

    Cheers to a free world!

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    Senior Member Dodger's Avatar
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    I was chatting to Duncan last night about this and similar things and asked how do you get the courage? simple agreement from so many, to say, on the count of three over the top of the trenches and at 'em lads, when minutes before you saw loads of other guys do this and all get shot? or okay lads going to storm the beaches against heavy artillery, machine gun nests etc etc running towards the machine gun nests with all your friends falling around you?

    I've never been in the army and sort of realise its the young guys doing this who are mentally immortal in many ways, they are trained to just take orders and go over the top, but why didn't a load of them go, 'heh Captain this doesn't seem such a great idea' or 'okay you guys, I just got to go for a leak, don't wait around for me I'll catch up laters!!!
    slampay likes this.
    Custard should be a colour...cos I could then paint over the mess I've just made!!!

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    Senior Member slampay's Avatar
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    My sentiments also. It's happened throughout history, and I've never quite got my mind around it. But crazy glory nonetheless.

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    Quote Originally Posted by slampay View Post
    Yay America!

    Did Australia watch it live? Or on tape delay?


    Jk..... Great day for freedom, the sacrifices of that day are truely awe inspiring.

    Cheers to a free world!


    C'mon Slambo - Aussies were in Europe from the start - 1939.

    But, just for you -

    Australian contribution to the Battle of Normandy

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    Australian and British pilots of No. 453 Squadron RAAF in Normandy during July 1944


    The Australian contribution to the Battle of Normandy involved approximately 3,000 military personnel serving under British command. The majority of these personnel were members of the Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF), though smaller numbers of Australians serving with the Royal Navy and British Army also participated in the fighting prior to and after the Allied landings on 6 June 1944. While all the RAAF units based in the United Kingdom (UK) took part in the battle, Australians made up only a small portion of the Allied force.
    The number of Australians who supported the D-Day invasion included between 2,000 and 2,500 RAAF airmen in Australian squadrons and British Royal Air Force units and approximately 500 members of the Royal Australian Navy serving in Royal Navy vessels, as well as a small number of Australian Army officers and merchant seamen. The army personnel and thousands of Australian airmen also took part in the subsequent Battle of Normandy between June and August 1944, and an RAAF fighter squadron operated from airfields in Normandy. Throughout the campaign, Australian airmen provided direct support to the Allied ground forces by attacking German military units and their supply lines, as well as forming part of the force which defended the beachhead from air attack and manning transport aircraft. Australians also indirectly supported the campaign by attacking German submarines and ships which posed a threat to the invasion force. The 13 Australian Army officers who took part in the campaign filled a variety of roles in British units in order to gain experience that they could take back to Australia.
    Australian personnel also took part in the invasion of Southern France in August 1944, and RAAF airmen continued to operate against German forces until the end of the war in May 1945. However, the relatively low casualties suffered by the Allied air forces during the fighting in Normandy and subsequent campaigns resulted in an over-supply of trained Australian aircrew in the UK, hundreds of whom were never assigned to a combat role. Australia's contribution to the fighting in Normandy is commemorated in memorials and cemeteries in London and Normandy.

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    I rode along that Brittany / Normandy coast a few years ago and went to a couple of the cemetaries. It must have been carnage on a scale I can't imagine, they all have my respect.

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    Senior Member slampay's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve@thaib View Post
    I rode along that Brittany / Normandy coast a few years ago and went to a couple of the cemetaries. It must have been carnage on a scale I can't imagine, they all have my respect.
    Something I would very much like to do. Again, the sacrafice is hard to conceive.

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    I am always touched at the incredible courage it must have taken,first wave ..(especially on Omaha) must have been a total nightmare.
    Although so many doing incredible things in every theatre.

    Overlord was a masterpiece of planning,still the largest logistic event ever I believe.
    K2 likes this.

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    It's quite a place, wish I had some pictures. You look at the beach to the right and it's flat and featureless, no cover at all. Look at the cliffs to the left and they are almost made for putting machine guns on. There was nowhere for those guys to go once they were out of the boats, it's surreal to look at.

    I went to the American cemetary and the scale of it is staggering, just white crosses that appear to go on forever. A humbling experience.

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    Senior Member slampay's Avatar
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    I've done google street view of that site. Humbling is a understatement IMO.

    I will do this road trip, and I'll probably cry....

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    Quote Originally Posted by Evilbaz View Post
    C'mon Slambo - Aussies were in Europe from the start - 1939.
    .....plus the 30,000 or so ANZAC soldiers who were already there in Europe and have been there since the 1914-18 war .....

    ....besides we didn't need to go all the way to Europe to be in a war again .... with the hospital ship Centaur lying torpedoed by the Japs off Brisbane and the Australia unsuccessfully ducking their first kamikaze attack off the Phillipines, and with our soldiers battling Japanese garrisons from Borneo to Bougainville and our POWs dying in droves on the Sandakan Death Marches ..... I guess we Aussies just had other things to do at that time .....

    Lest We Forget ....

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    Senior Member Geespot's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dodger View Post
    I was chatting to Duncan last night about this and similar things and asked how do you get the courage? simple agreement from so many, to say, on the count of three over the top of the trenches and at 'em lads, when minutes before you saw loads of other guys do this and all get shot? or okay lads going to storm the beaches against heavy artillery, machine gun nests etc etc running towards the machine gun nests with all your friends falling around you?

    I've never been in the army and sort of realise its the young guys doing this who are mentally immortal in many ways, they are trained to just take orders and go over the top, but why didn't a load of them go, 'heh Captain this doesn't seem such a great idea' or 'okay you guys, I just got to go for a leak, don't wait around for me I'll catch up laters!!!
    Read so much on the 2nd World War

    I think it's a simple combination of youth don't think too much and an overwhelming sense of duty, the UK and to a lesser extent the United States were fighting for their very existence

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    Senior Member geir's Avatar
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    Little bit off topic, but another another big event during the world war2. Norway was easy taken by the Germans, but some guys did a fantastic job later on....
    Norwegian heavy water sabotage - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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    Immense when you consider how much went wrong for the allies too, I'd recommend a very good book called Double Cross by Ben MacIntyre about the spy network Britain setup to fool the Germans into thinking they were going make the shorter channel crossing and attack Calais instead. They successfully diverted huge amounts of axis troops and tanks to give the Allies time to establish the beach head at Normandy.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Evilbaz View Post
    Today is the anniversary of D-Day - the Invasion of Normandy - 6th of June 1944 - and a turning point in the WW2 and the restoration of democracy to Europe.
    Technically it's tomorrow baz.

    We're on the wrong side of the anti-meridian.

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    Quote Originally Posted by dontpanic View Post
    I'd recommend a very good book called Double Cross by Ben MacIntyre about the spy network Britain setup to fool the Germans into thinking they were going make the shorter channel crossing and attack Calais instead. They successfully diverted huge amounts of axis troops and tanks to give the Allies time to establish the beach head at Normandy.
    Another book he wrote was "Operation Mincemeat: How a Dead Man and a Bizarre Plan Fooled the Nazis and Assured an Allied Victory" using declassified documents and letters from the principles involved in the plan to tell the story of how they managed to hoodwink the Nazis.

    Of course if you don't want to read the book, here's a documentary on it.


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    Been reading a book now about the liberation of Europe. Story of an american who fought from D-day till about they were standing near Berlin. He wasn't in Normandy on D-Day but the were dropped at the coast of Sicily. Everybody speaks about Omaha beach and the beaches nearby while in fact there were more operations starting at the same time in different places.
    So far it's a good read.
    Stress is when you wake up screaming realizing you weren't sleeping.

  18. #18
    Senior Member dontpanic's Avatar
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    Seen Operation Mincemeat and have the book to read for my trip in a couple of weeks. Great story.

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    Senior Member billpay's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by beuk View Post
    Been reading a book now about the liberation of Europe. Story of an american who fought from D-day till about they were standing near Berlin. He wasn't in Normandy on D-Day but the were dropped at the coast of Sicily. Everybody speaks about Omaha beach and the beaches nearby while in fact there were more operations starting at the same time in different places.
    So far it's a good read.
    What's the name of the book?

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