Results 1 to 17 of 17
Like Tree19Likes
  • 7 Post By Homer
  • 7 Post By billpay
  • 2 Post By obes
  • 2 Post By faultytowers
  • 1 Post By faultytowers

Thread: ANZAC Day

  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    1,385

    ANZAC Day

    They shall grow not old, as we that are left grow old:
    Age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn
    At the going down of the sun and in the morning
    We will remember them.


    Lest we forget
    LivinLOS, dawsey, Dkdude and 4 others like this.

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    2,059
    Lest we forget.
    I'll be wearing a red poppy as soon as I put a shirt on.
    The Gallipoli dawn service starts at 9.30am on Australia Network.
    Sipping from the Fountain of Youth that is Thailand.

  3. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    377
    Pissed down rain for the march in old Sydney town today, dawn service was fine weather though.

    Eddie and Katherine lobbed in at the memorial in Canberra this morning for the dawn service, nice touch from them.

  4. #4
    Senior Member billpay's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    2,046
    Big respect to veterans of all countries for their selfless sacrifice.
    slampay, Pablo, Homer and 4 others like this.
    The sooner you fall behind, the more time you'll have to catch up.

  5. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    The cold Wong
    Posts
    1,591
    Lest We Forget !

    Missed the dawn service by.....that much this morning.
    Knocked off work just as the sun came up = too late. Looked like a good turn out in our little village too !

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    The cold Wong
    Posts
    1,591
    Beneath the Faded Word
    By Peter Thomas, Mt Martha, Vic.

    It sat out in the shearing shed for 30 years or more,
    With cobwebs, dust and binder twine, and sheep dung on the floor.
    An old and rusted Lockwood kept its secrets from my eyes,

    A cabin trunk of leather, there since 1945.
    I asked my dad, who owned it and what we kept it for,
    He replied, “It’s Uncle Basil’s, that he brought back from the war.
    So don’t you bloody touch it, or I’ll tan your bloody hide!”
    But that only made me more intrigued to see what was inside.
    I wondered at its mysteries and the secrets that it hid,
    Beneath the faded word “Tobruk” stencilled on the lid.

    Near Wilcannia,where only hardy cattlemen will go,
    Uncle Basil had a station, Baden Park, near Ivanhoe.
    A strong and gentle man, who once rode the BirdsvilleTrack
    Just to prove he wasn’t hampered by the shrapnel in his back.

    So I stood alone and weighed it up; which would I decide,
    Should I leave the memories undisturbed, or take a look inside?
    I knew I had to take a look to see what it’d hold.
    Medals? Spoils from the war – silver, jewels or gold?

    The old man went off fishin’ of a Sunday with Bob Gray,
    Sp if I was gonna do it – that would have to be the day.
    I started out determined – I was done by ten past two.
    With half a broken hacksaw blade, I cut the padlock through,
    But even as I opened it, the truth was plain and clear,
    The old trunk held no gold or jewels, there was no treasure here .
    A pile of letters tied with string, an old moth eaten flag,
    A rusty metal helmet and mouldy webbing bag,
    A cup made from a jam tin, an emufeathered hat,
    And a newspaper clipping with the title “Desert Rat”,
    Some photos of the pyramids – a rusty bayonet,
    An IOU – Jack Carmody – two quid ( a two-up bet).

    I folded out a faded map as the day began to wane,
    Foreign placeslike Benghazi, Tobruk, El Alamein.
    Then I came upon a satchel and a little leather book
    And a photo of some youngblokes – so I took a closer look.
    It was 20 young recruits, their faces tanned and worn
    From placeslike Cohuna, Moama and Bamawm.
    Farmers, shearers, stockmen off to fight a noble war,
    For the empire in a foreign land they’d never seen before.
    And scrawled across the bottom, in writing rough and coarse,
    Twenty names below the words, the EchucaBoys – Light Horse.




    I turned the photo over, and there upon the back
    Were words that sent a chill through me, and made my mouth go slack.
    A solemn list of 20 – the fate of each the same.
    Every one but Uncle Basil had a date beside their name,
    Some said April ’43, some said June /July.
    A record from our history, the date that each had died.
    I turned back to the photo and looked in every face,
    And written over each one was a month, a year, a place.
    A grinning, sun-bronzed soldier’s face, each now with a name
    Like November 1943 – the words El Alamein.

    I wonder did they think, as they sailed across the foam,
    That amongst them only one – Uncle Basil – would come home?
    Recorded in that little book – I remember to this day –
    A record of their actions and how each had passed away,

    A mortar shell out on patrol; a sniper in the night;
    A landmine took one’s legs off – he died before first light.
    The death of each was brutal, the reality was stark.
    Forty pages written there, I finished just on dark.

    I slowly closed that record of the men who kept us free
    And turned to see my father, standing silently.
    He didn’t do his block as I expected that he would,
    He just said, “Come on pack it up, I reckon that we should.”
    So with loving care we packed away the treasures from the past,
    When I came upon the photograph – it was put aside ‘till last –
    And with new respect and love, I recorded there his fate.
    Next to Uncle Basil I wrote April ’68.
    Yeah, Dad and I we packed it up and put it back again
    And wrapped it in a bit of tarp, to keep it from the rain.
    We never spoke about it or discussed what I had read.
    I reckon that was his way, to respect those men long dead.

    There’s a statue of a digger in most every country town,
    And a list of names of locals, who fought with great renown.
    And now, when I go by, I remember what I read,
    Sitting on the floor out there, in our old shearing shed.
    And I think of Uncle Gordon,lost somewhere on Ambon,
    Uncle Jack on the Kokoda and, in England, Uncle John.
    I remember still that photo, with sadness and remorse,
    That mob of grinning faces, the EchucaBoys – Light Horse.
    In a cemetery near Ivanhoe lies a bloke who’s left his mark,
    Basil Thomas, of Echuca,Tobruk and Baden park.


    Lest We Forget

    TLandHim and LivinLOS like this.

  7. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    The cold Wong
    Posts
    1,591
    Double post - sorry !

  8. #8
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    930
    Thanks Obes
    Well put and pretty emotional.

    And they were all so darn young.
    They never really got a chance to live.

  9. #9
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    The cold Wong
    Posts
    1,591
    Quote Originally Posted by TLandHim View Post
    Thanks Obes
    Well put and pretty emotional.

    And they were all so darn young.
    They never really got a chance to live.
    Hopefully we'll never forget them and the sacrifices they all made !

  10. #10
    Senior Member faultytowers's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    1,496
    "Lest We Forget"



    "Absent Friends"




    PadMC and Homer like this.

  11. #11
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    2,059
    Quote Originally Posted by faultytowers View Post
    "Lest We Forget"



    "Absent Friends"




    Good one Faulty.
    Sipping from the Fountain of Youth that is Thailand.

  12. #12
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    2,059
    And " The Unacknowledged " ... the more things change the more they stay the same.

    Redgum - I Was Only 19 (1983) - YouTube
    Sipping from the Fountain of Youth that is Thailand.

  13. #13
    Senior Member faultytowers's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    1,496
    In a foreign land , far from the battlefields , far from their home countries , they are not forgotten.

    Harefield Junior School kids honour Anzac heroes with floral tributes

    A head teacher from Harefield Junior School back then noticed the body of a dead Australian soldier being wheeled on a barrow down the main street to the local cemetery. He took the school’s Union Jack flag down and lay it on the Digger and declared that no man should die without a shroud of his colours.

    From that day his primary school children would collect flowers in the fields to take to a manor home turned hospital to brighten the lives of the wounded and dying and lift what was misery for the village with the site of many more men being wheeled to the cemetery.

    The school’s learning mentor Sue Ashton took children into the fields about the village on the weekend, carrying on the tradition although these days flowers are delivered to Anzac graves, and not bedsides, during an Anzac Day march through the village.
    No Cookies | Herald Sun
    Homer likes this.

  14. #14
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    1,385
    Quote Originally Posted by faultytowers View Post
    "Lest We Forget"



    "Absent Friends"




    This is on my playlist only it's by redgum because I couldn't find who did the original. I'll look for that.

    Embarrassingly I have to say I often skip it because it is a song that you have to be in the mood for. Such a poignant ballad for mine and probably the best I have heard.

    When I was a young man I carried me pack...

  15. #15
    Senior Member PadMC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Germany
    Posts
    747
    ^ Yeah it's a lovely version I must say.

  16. #16
    Senior Member faultytowers's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    1,496
    Quote Originally Posted by Homer View Post
    This is on my playlist only it's by redgum because I couldn't find who did the original. I'll look for that.
    The version I posted is by Eric Bogle (Scottish-born Australian singer-songwriter) he wrote the song in 1971.

    The first "recorded" version was by "Rockin" John Curry in 1975 .

  17. #17
    Senior Member PadMC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Germany
    Posts
    747
    McGowan did a nice version too.


Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •