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Thread: Reading

  1. #1
    Senior Member marc26's Avatar
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    Reading

    I realized i haven't been reading as much as i usually do in the last 8months or so and also realized it really effects my mind/stress levels

    When i am on a usual pattern i can read 2-4 books/mo, about 6-7 magazines and about 20 newspaper articles a day
    I am probably reading more articles but it is the books and long features in magazines that settle me down, sort of centre me

    I don't really know why i made this post, just thought today about how much reading really means, i've been doing it from such a young age(my mom and brother were huge readers)

    Well the Vancouver Library has a great annual sale on Oct24, i am talking good books for 1usd, so i should be able to grab a bunch

  2. #2
    Super Moderator LivinLOS's Avatar
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    I havent been able to concentrate for a few months.. Lots of life stresses..

    Even books I know I will enjoy, like the Hugh Howley silo series.. I just cant keep focused on it without getting side tracked.

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    Senior Member soupdragon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LivinLOS View Post
    I havent been able to concentrate for a few months.. Lots of life stresses..

    Even books I know I will enjoy, like the Hugh Howley silo series.. I just cant keep focused on it without getting side tracked.
    You need a holiday, I hear Samui is nice.
    obes likes this.

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    Senior Member Thin White Duke's Avatar
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    I used to read a lot as a kid.......fiction books.

    These days I mostly just read when on holiday......besides news articles and Internet stuff which I read daily.

    Need to sort of relax and not be side-tracked to get into those books again.
    Last edited by Thin White Duke; 16th October 2013 at 18:33. Reason: added

  5. #5
    Senior Member sundancekid's Avatar
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    Not so much reading as I used to either, but lately tried to switch to audio books. Find it much more relaxing to just close my eyes and drift off. Spend way too much time focusing on a monitor anyway.

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    I have been on a WW2 kick lately with a trip to China and all the flights and all I started with a book about some people trapped on glaciers in Greenland after their planes went down in during the build up of troops in the UK before Normandy, now I am almost finished with the "Liberation Trilogy" which covers the North African Campaign in one volume, moves on the Sicily/Italy in the 2nd, then finishes with Normandy onward. Really gets into the personalities of the high command figures in the US and British Armies, while still following the details in the trenches. They are really well done.

    I really like non-fiction.

  7. #7
    Senior Member slampay's Avatar
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    ^^^ Brian, I go back and forth, and like you I get "kicks". Just ending a phase of non-fiction about the American Indian during the frontier days. Some incredible reading out there on this subject and I was consumed for almost two months!

    If anybody is interested, this is the book that got me on the subject:

    Empire of the Summer Moon: Quanah Parker and the Rise and Fall of the Comanches, the Most Powerful Indian Tribe in American History:Amazon:Books

    It's amazing and I was shocked at what I didn't know.

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    Senior Member Snakebite911's Avatar
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    Just finished another Hugh Howey book, "I, Zombie", recommend it, but it is most definitively not a "feel-good" book.... The other side of zombie fiction..

  9. #9
    Super Moderator LivinLOS's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Snakebite911 View Post
    Just finished another Hugh Howey book, "I, Zombie", recommend it, but it is most definitively not a "feel-good" book.... The other side of zombie fiction..
    Yeah Slam mentioned that.. I REALLY like the crazy perspective in that..

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    Great timing, m26(formally known as Paulie) , i've finished reading a book today, the first i've read in probably 6 months, (not easy with a young family also), but I always have had 2-3 books at any time on the go.

    Just read iCon, an autobiography about Steve Jobs, pretty incredible reading TBH.

  11. #11
    Senior Member PadMC's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kuhio View Post
    I have been on a WW2 kick lately with a trip to China and all the flights and all I started with a book about some people trapped on glaciers in Greenland after their planes went down in during the build up of troops in the UK before Normandy, now I am almost finished with the "Liberation Trilogy" which covers the North African Campaign in one volume, moves on the Sicily/Italy in the 2nd, then finishes with Normandy onward. Really gets into the personalities of the high command figures in the US and British Armies, while still following the details in the trenches. They are really well done.

    I really like non-fiction.
    You'd probably enjoy Naples '44 by Norman Lewis. It's a dairy of a young British intelligence officers time in Italy after the 1943 landings there. Very good read. The author went on to write many travel books after the war. Lewis is a really underrated writer, I've also read his The Honoured Society, a history of the Mafia. He has one about his travels in South East Asia during the 1950's also, I intend to get.

    Just read this good review.

    Rereading: Naples '44 by Norman Lewis | Books | The Guardian
    Last edited by PadMC; 18th October 2013 at 20:58.

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    Quote Originally Posted by slampay View Post
    ^^^ Brian, I go back and forth, and like you I get "kicks". Just ending a phase of non-fiction about the American Indian during the frontier days. Some incredible reading out there on this subject and I was consumed for almost two months!

    If anybody is interested, this is the book that got me on the subject:

    Empire of the Summer Moon: Quanah Parker and the Rise and Fall of the Comanches, the Most Powerful Indian Tribe in American History:Amazon:Books

    It's amazing and I was shocked at what I didn't know.
    Fascinating period and a lot of factors other than just overwhelming white migration came into into the final outcome.
    As I understand it the Comanches mastered the horse better than anyone else and had 10 of thousands in their herds. I'll have a hunt for that book but we have 3 months coming up in Thailand and I can't take too many books with me.

    Have read a lot on this period of the west and have to admire all who were there, it was a harsh and unforgiving country. Started a few years ago when I picked up a book by Larry McMurtry called Roads in a second hand shop in Vicksburg and I liked his style of writing and noticed a book in a Dallas shop called Lonesome Dove that he had written. I hadn't seen the TV series but loved the book and have read plenty of his since.
    As a result, travelled to several places including the Powder River and of course, Little Big Horn and many of the sites of conflict and forts and trails.
    The more you know the more questions open up and the more answers you need to seek.
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  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by PadMC View Post
    You'd probably enjoy Naples '44 by Norman Lewis. It's a dairy of a young British intelligence officers time in Italy after the 1943 landings there. Very good read. The author went on to write many travel books after the war. Lewis is a really underrated writer, I've also read his The Honoured Society, a history of the Mafia. He has one about his travels in South East Asia during the 1950's also, I intend to get.

    Just read this good review.

    Rereading: Naples '44 by Norman Lewis | Books | The Guardian
    Will check it out.

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    All the Pretty Horses (novel) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    I've read 2 of the trilogy. The time period is the transition of the very end of the wild west to the beginning of modern life in 1949.

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    Senior Member PadMC's Avatar
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    did you read The Road? good wee read also. 100 pages of nightmare.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by PadMC View Post
    did you read The Road? good wee read also. 100 pages of nightmare.
    Saw the movie. Didn't realize he wrote that as well as No Country for Old Men. I should start reading him again. The Orchard Keeper written in 1965 could be interesting. I guess his first novel.

  17. #17
    Senior Member slampay's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PadMC View Post
    did you read The Road? good wee read also. 100 pages of nightmare.
    Yes, I read it twice. I dig post-apocalyptic stuff. That and the fact the story was about a father and son, and the lengths "papa" would go to to protect his son, really resonated with me.

    The movie sucked...
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  18. #18
    Senior Member slampay's Avatar
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    Just finished this last night and really liked it. It tells the story of two pilots (one American, one German) who by chance met over Germany during WW2. Incredible...


    A Higher Call: An Incredible True Story of Combat and Chivalry in the War-Torn Skies of World War II: Adam Makos, Larry Alexander: 9780425252864: Amazon.com: Books

  19. #19
    Senior Member billpay's Avatar
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    ^That looks great! Just bought it. Have you read 'Unbroken'? If you haven't, check it out. One of the best books I've ever read, and a looong book, which I love!
    The sooner you fall behind, the more time you'll have to catch up.

  20. #20
    Senior Member slampay's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by billpay View Post
    ^That looks great! Just bought it. Have you read 'Unbroken'? If you haven't, check it out. One of the best books I've ever read, and a looong book, which I love!
    Yes, unbroken was amazing, simply amazing. And "the bird" was as evil as anyone I've read about.

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