Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 25

Thread: Will this assistance turn our brains to mush ??

  1. #1
    Super Moderator LivinLOS's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    14,153

    Will this assistance turn our brains to mush ??

    Okay, Google, you officially beat Siri | VentureBeat | Mobile | by Meghan Kelly

    Over a year and a half ago I was beyond excited with Siri and the possibilities Apple could explore with it. I wrote this article and argued that Siri took a more personal approach to digital personal assistants and thus could engage and learn more about the user than ever before.

    I even risked saying that the search game could be changed with a service like Siri, as Siri would learn about you in a unique way and then start to anticipate results that were more relevant to you.

    I clearly remember one night when Siri surprised me in an unprecedented way. I was used to asking her to wake me up in the morning. I believe it just felt better, psychologically, to ask “wake me up at 7am” than setting up the alarm app manually.

    One night I was going to bed unusually late and asked her the same question. To my surprise she added to the default message “don’t worry, I won’t forget it”. Isn’t this the reassuring message that you want to hear when you fear that the alarm might not work and then you might sleep-in due to the short night of sleep? I thought that was an amazing touch, a sign that some layer of intelligence was indeed being added to Siri.

    Unfortunately though, that was the only moment of bliss in my relationship with Siri.

    I still use the service on occasion, but for the most part, I get annoyed with the Siri’s delay in simply understanding what I am saying. A recording of my voice needs to hit the cloud in order to be translated to text back to me before Siri replies. Also, my accent still sometimes gets in the way, and she didn’t learn even a single thing about me or my personality. Generally, it appears that her abilities only grow in incremental bits whenever Apple decides to do so.

    One night in New York I was packing for a trip to Brazil and asked Siri what the weather was like in São Paulo. To my dismay she replied, “Here’s the weather for Brasilia, Brazil, through Wednesday next week.” Well, Brasilia, the capital of Brazil, is 500 miles away from São Paulo, and its weather so distinctive, we could say it’s a different country.

    Then I decided to try the new Google conversational search with the same question.

    “OK Google, what’s the weather like in São Paulo?” — and I see the words being interpreted by Google as I say them, which is great. An instant later, I hear back:

    “Here’s the weather forecast for São Paulo, Brazil, for Sunday night.” Oh, wait, do you know that I am traveling on the morning flight and getting there at night? Also impressive, Google used a web service to correct what it had understood initially from my question to something that made complete sense. Siri usually apologizes for not getting what I said.

    “OK Google, how do I get to Avenida Paulista?” And I was given driving directions from the GRU airport to Avenida Paulista.

    Google’s best response to Siri comes in the form of the mobile service called “Google Now,” which has an iOS version as well as the obviously more powerful Android one. Both versions can leverage the meaningful conversational search I reference above.

    While Apple still does a better job positioning Siri as a personal assistant, Google Now appears to consider context far better than Siri does. For example, a few days ago I was in my living room with the TV on when I checked Google Now on my new Android phone. I was presented a card with a question “Are you watching live TV?” And I was able to let Google listen to a few seconds of the program to present me more information about it.

    Funny thing though, when I tried to show this feature to a friend who visited me during the day, it didn’t work. But it continues to work at night. I know that Google can detect if my TV is connected to the same Wifi network as my phone, but is Google Now also considering the fact that I don’t usually watch TV during the day? I think it’s plausible.

    Another example of context and learning is that in the morning of my latest flight to Brazil. After several trips, Google Now “knows” that I usually take the train to the airport, so it sent me a notification for when I should leave for JFK, a New York area airport, considering the timetables of NYC’s transit trains close to me. It also updated me about gate changes even before American Airlines. I think this is simply awesome.

    Google Now is definitely a great response to Siri. Even that impersonal approach found in previous versions of Google Voice Search has changed with the “OK Google,” “OK Google Now,” or “OK Glass” commands. Google, Glass and other “entities” will become our assistants the way we wanted Siri to be.

    I knew Google could catch up and maybe this massive improvement was under way at the time of my first article. But it’s a fact that this example exposes one of the major competitive advantages of Google: their cloud services are evolving much faster than those of its competitors. Also, Google is seriously adding layers of intelligence to most of its services so that it leverages patterns found in people’s behaviors.

    Whatever the future of digital assistants may be, it’s clear that the service must be fully context-aware, super responsive, and most importantly, learn about you. If Apple doesn’t empower Siri with a true digital brain, the service will soon become a joke when compared to the significant improvements Google Now is achieving.

    I can’t wait to see what comes next when Apple seriously addresses Siri’s shortcomings and Google keeps improving their machine learning algorithms. The layer of intelligence that really made a difference in my experience was in fact an “emotional intelligence.” Like all human-centric relationships, Apple or Google’s machine learning algorithms will continue to make us fall in love with them when they find new ways to connect on a personal and emotional level.

    Emotional connections become stronger the more people learn about and get to know one another over time. Perhaps the love affair burns most deeply when they continue to find new ways to surprise us. OK Google Now, you get me.
    Part of me, the geeky tech loving side, loves all this innovation, integration and sort of AI smarts that are evolving to help us.. But another side of me knows that once you start to use these things routinely you lose the skills yourself. Look at any younger person unable to add 3 numbers together, hell I used to have a really sharp math mind, could add double / triple digit numbers up as fast as someone could say them and I caught myself recently pulling out the phone calculator for a simple sum instead of just thinking it.

    Also I know how reliant I have become with GPS tools, and I find once you fall into trusting one too much, you dont pay attention to your surrounding markers in the same way.. You allow yourself to be guided rather than memorizing the route firmly in your head.

    Once we get to the point where our tech devices are (spying on us) and mapping every movement and schedule of our lives.. Organizing our movement on transport timetables, etc etc.. Will our heads just be full of reality TV and clicking TMZ celebrity news links as we walk along looking at our screens telling us which step to take ??

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    917
    Think you are right. The GPS reliance is very true, on the other hand it makes it so much easier travelling in a strange country, except Thailand where you have so many variations on spelling it is just an exercise in frustration loading a new address.

    Remember when you knew all your commonly used 6 and 7 digit phone numbers in your head?
    How many do you know now?

  3. #3
    Super Moderator LivinLOS's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    14,153
    Quote Originally Posted by TLandHim View Post
    Remember when you knew all your commonly used 6 and 7 digit phone numbers in your head?
    100%.. My head is good with numbers, I used to have loads of phone numbers in my head.. 10's I knew by heart, some I can still remember.. These days if you need to use a phone, and your cell phonebook isnt there, even the most commonly used ones you dont have.

  4. #4
    Senior Member Thin White Duke's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Afrique du Sud
    Posts
    2,891
    Besides the possible loss of physical ability as the body is used less and less.

    So could just end up with a big head and not much else like the Mekon from the 2000 AD comics.

    Scary that

  5. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    373
    Quote Originally Posted by Thin White Duke View Post
    Besides the possible loss of physical ability as the body is used less and less.

    So could just end up with a big head and not much else like the Mekon from the 2000 AD comics.

    Scary that
    I see this often,(loss of ability), handwriting skills are aplaurable these days, the kids don't write as much as we used to, therefore they 'can't' write well.

    BTW, I couldn't recall 1 single phone number, not even my wifes' or my work number. 55

  6. #6
    Senior Member soupdragon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Bang Tao
    Posts
    2,367
    Resistance is futile, you will be assimilated.

  7. #7
    Senior Member Bacon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    797
    Another scary thing is that all convos with Siri are permanently recorded on Apple servers. Google might be doing the same.

    And as people have more and more conversations with them, more and more of their thoughts and personality structure is backed up and saved who knows where.
    ןooʇsɹɐq ʎɯ uo ʞɔɐq eɯ ʇnd esɐeןd sıɥʇ pɐeɹ uɐɔ noʎ ɟı

  8. #8
    Senior Member Robaht's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    598
    Same here. There are a handful of numbers that pre-dated heavy cellphone use and I have those completely memorized still, even if I use contacts, etc. to dial them now. For the numbers after cellphone use, it's kind of like, oh I think is ends in 077 or something…However if I'm forced to dial them a few times for whatever reason (such as a Skype call), after a few times they usually click in at least so I have a fighting chance of remembering them!

    Quote Originally Posted by LivinLOS View Post
    100%.. My head is good with numbers, I used to have loads of phone numbers in my head.. 10's I knew by heart, some I can still remember.. These days if you need to use a phone, and your cell phonebook isnt there, even the most commonly used ones you dont have.

  9. #9
    Senior Member slampay's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    1,639
    Holy shit! I just got a new tablet with this tech. The voice recognition is crazy. I've spent about 15 minutes with it and I'm loving it! 555

    My minds already mush, so I'm looking forward to the help.555

  10. #10
    Super Moderator LivinLOS's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    14,153
    Quote Originally Posted by slampay View Post
    Holy shit! I just got a new tablet with this tech. The voice recognition is crazy. I've spent about 15 minutes with it and I'm loving it! 555
    Yeah the google now and OK google in kitkat is impressive.. Never used those features before but I was driving the car and managed a whole series of whatsapp messaging with voice recognition.. Impressed.

  11. #11
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    682
    Quote Originally Posted by TLandHim View Post
    Think you are right. The GPS reliance is very true, on the other hand it makes it so much easier travelling in a strange country, except Thailand where you have so many variations on spelling it is just an exercise in frustration loading a new address.

    Remember when you knew all your commonly used 6 and 7 digit phone numbers in your head?
    How many do you know now?
    GPS and Siri aren't the problem (GPS is useful and Siri is useless).

    Its technologies that encourage us to be lazy in life threatening situations. My biggest complaint is for drivers aids like lane assist and brake assist that coddle drivers when they dont pay attention. Things like electronic blind spot checks actively encourage barely competent motorists to check their mirrors and turn their heads even less than they did without them. They honestly believe that the technology is just as good when it's worse, the technology is 100% reactive (I.E. you have to be in danger for the alarm to go off with a blind spot check) where as turning your head and checking over your shoulder is proactive.

    Its like handing someone a pair of gloves and telling them to go pull those wires out of the wall. It's getting to the point that they wont even check if the mains has been switched off (let alone if there were any capacitors that needed discharging).
    This post is known by the state of California to potentially contain more than the maximum daily allowance of awesome.

  12. #12
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    917
    Quote Originally Posted by mjwx View Post
    Its technologies that encourage us to be lazy in life threatening situations. My biggest complaint is for drivers aids like lane assist and brake assist that coddle drivers when they dont pay attention. Things like electronic blind spot checks actively encourage barely competent motorists to check their mirrors and turn their heads even less than they did without them. They honestly believe that the technology is just as good when it's worse, the technology is 100% reactive (I.E. you have to be in danger for the alarm to go off with a blind spot check) where as turning your head and checking over your shoulder is proactive.
    Had never thought the car sensors through and MJWX you are right. We let incompetents on the road with low skill sets and of course they will rely on what are meant to be back ups instead of mastering the task properly like looking in a mirror constantly etc.

  13. #13
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    682
    Quote Originally Posted by TLandHim View Post
    Had never thought the car sensors through and MJWX you are right. We let incompetents on the road with low skill sets and of course they will rely on what are meant to be back ups instead of mastering the task properly like looking in a mirror constantly etc.
    The problem isn't simply letting them onto the roads, it's letting them stay there.

    A test only demonstrates how good you are on the day (and if you aren't good enough you just come back next week), however once someone gets their full license in Australia all rules go out the window. Lane discipline, speed discipline, keeping proper distance, looking, indicating and the number of numpties on the phone astounds me. Earlier this week I pulled up next to a VW Passat in a right turn sliplane. The steering wheel atendant was so engrossed in her phone that she missed the green arrow completely. I'm not even sure if the teggy woke her up when my light went green.

    It's just too hard for obviously stupid or dangerous people to lose their license. I'm not normally one who calls for harsher laws (normally it's the opposite) but these tossers can easily kill someone (including me).
    This post is known by the state of California to potentially contain more than the maximum daily allowance of awesome.

  14. #14
    Super Moderator LivinLOS's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    14,153
    However it's trivial to lose your license (in the uk) just by being a few kph over a crazy low speed limit on a clear open country rd..

    Some if the uk camera enforcement is just ridiculous, done for revenue generation not safety.. I am all for genuine safety ones, red light cameras etc... But with uk country rds having 30 mph even 20 in some points it's completely daft.

  15. #15
    Super Moderator LivinLOS's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    14,153
    Great timing..


  16. #16
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    682
    Now I've rallied against many forms of driver assist technologies are creating lazy drivers and coddling laziness and complacency (both deadly traits on the road) but this takes the cake.

    2015 Ford Mustang's Secret Feature Is Burnout Control: Exclusive

    we've been able to confirm that one of the secret features in the 2015 Mustang will indeed be an electronic system that will help drivers execute the perfect, smoky, epic burnout. Think launch control for burnouts.
    Oh for fucks sake, launch control for burnouts?

    Granted that doing a burnout isn't exactly the height of sensibility but at the very least it demonstrated that the nut behind the wheel actually knew enough about what they were doing to be able to do a burnout... It used to be competition amongst teenage boys (and men who never grew up) but now you've got a computer doing it for you. They took our manuals, they took our throttle cables, is nothing sacred to these people?

    OK, given how lazy todays drivers are, being unable to stop stuffing their faces or get off the phone long enough to indicate, pushing the burnout button may be too much for many of them.

    And just wait until this kind of technology gets implemented in the driverless car. You're on the phone whilst being driven along the freeway telling someone you're just about to drift off to sleep and suddenly you're going sideways.
    This post is known by the state of California to potentially contain more than the maximum daily allowance of awesome.

  17. #17
    Senior Member sundancekid's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    6,142
    Quote Originally Posted by LivinLOS View Post
    Great timing..
    Kind of liked that little snippet. Watched a docu recently on how different kinds of IQ relate to the standardized tests. At one point, the brain activity of one the upper echelon Mensa guys was measured when he conducted an IQ test, and it recorded very little activity at all. At least very few connections among different parts of the brain. As if he was on auto-pilot almost…

    Hardly a very creative exercise for him, was my first thought. (Although the test conductors seemed overly impressed by the results…)

    Always thought the making of connections was a much more important exercise than remembering specific facts or numbers. What profession really needs on-the-fly facts these days anyways? Of course, facts do matter. But I think a more important part is an inherent and perpetual curiosity towards the unknown. And perhaps the ability of making on-the-fly connections instead?

  18. #18
    Senior Member sundancekid's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    6,142
    Quote Originally Posted by mjwx View Post
    And just wait until this kind of technology gets implemented in the driverless car. You're on the phone whilst being driven along the freeway telling someone you're just about to drift off to sleep and suddenly you're going sideways.
    Just curious, how would you deem the chances of driverless cars (or pooled pods or whatever term used) in our lifetime? Say in 40 years time? (Yeah, I wish...)

    Pretty sure transportation in general will change radically over the next two decades. But replaced with what? Still interesting to ponder what the LA - SF drive would be like 20 years from now...

  19. #19
    Super Moderator LivinLOS's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    14,153
    40 years.. ohh hell yeah..

    Will be surprised if driverless isnt here in half that.. Bothers me that it might become mandatory for 'safety' etc..

  20. #20
    Senior Member kaptainrob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Chiang Mai
    Posts
    366
    Quote Originally Posted by snowy View Post
    I see this often,(loss of ability), handwriting skills are aplaurable these days, the kids don't write as much as we used to, therefore they 'can't' write well.

    BTW, I couldn't recall 1 single phone number, not even my wifes' or my work number. 55

    Forget to turn on SpellCheck, Snowy? 555

    I still remember my 1st landline no: 586063 and mobile number 0414364054 but can't recall the current one.
    Cheers, Rob.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •