Results 1 to 9 of 9
Like Tree2Likes
  • 1 Post By nelsonone
  • 1 Post By K2

Thread: Burma’s failed promise

  1. #1
    Super Moderator LivinLOS's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    14,153

    Burma’s failed promise


  2. #2
    Senior Member nelsonone's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    2,862
    To call it a "civilian" Govt is stretching the truth beyond wild imagination imo...the vast majority of seats, 2/3rd iirc, are military appointments...

    These military types don't give up power without guarantees that their replacements/lackies will do what they require of them

  3. #3
    K2
    K2 is offline
    Super Moderator K2's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    1,543
    It's 25% of the seats that are reserved for the military currently ...

    ....[March 2010] a quarter of the 440 parliament seats will be reserved for the military officials...
    Wiki

    The main problem with this is that to overturn the ban on someone with a foreigner husband (dead or not) running for president needs a 75% majority.

    BBC News - Myanmar profile - Overview

    Actually I am not that pessimistic over the pace of reforms or demorcatisation in Myanmar - I think perhaps it will follows a more planned (Chinese/Singaporean) model but commitment to pressing forward with fuller engagement economically will not be reversed IMO.

    As I have said elsewhere the majority Buddhist hatred of the the Rohingya will not be reversed easily - hence Suu Kyi's reluctance to take a firm stance on them - but outside of this sadder issue - the move forward and upwards will continue.
    Its My Life .....!

  4. #4
    Senior Member nelsonone's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    2,862
    Ministry Minister Name Party Notes
    Ministry of Home Affairs Ko Ko Military former SPDC
    Ministry of Defense Hla Min Military former SPDC
    Ministry of Border Affairs Thein Htay Military former SPDC
    Ministry of Industrial Development
    Ministry of Foreign Affairs Wunna Maung Lwin Military
    Ministry of Information Kyaw Hsan Military former SPDC
    Ministry of Culture
    Ministry of Agriculture and Irrigation Myint Hlaing USDP former SPDC Air Force Chief of Staff
    Ministry of Commerce Wunnakyawhtin Win Myint USDP
    Ministry of Construction Khin Maung Myint USDP former SPDC and Major General
    Ministry of Hotels and Tourism Tint Hsan USDP
    Ministry of Sports
    Ministry of Communications, Posts and Telegraphs Thein Tun USDP former SPDC Major General
    Ministry of Finance and Revenue Hla Tun USDP former SPDC and Major General
    Ministry of Mines Thein Htaik USDP former Lieutenant General
    Ministry of Transport Nyan Tun Aung USDP former SPDC
    Ministry of National Planning and Economic Development Tin Naing Thein USDP former SPDC Brigadier General
    Ministry of Livestock and Fisheries
    Ministry of Environmental Conservation and Forestry Win Tun Military former SPDC
    Ministry of Labor Aung Kyi USDP former SPDC
    Ministry of Social Welfare, Relief and Resettlement
    Ministry of Cooperatives Ohn Myint USDP former SPDC Lieutenant General
    Ministry of Industry Soe Thein USDP former SPDC
    Ministry of Energy Than Htay USDP former SPDC
    Ministry of Rail Transportation Aung Min USDP former SPDC Minister of Rail Transportation
    Ministry of Education Mya Aye -
    Ministry of Religious Affairs Myint Maung USDP former SPDC
    Ministry of Immigration and Population Khin Yi Military former SPDC Brigadier General,
    Ministry of Electric Power-1 Zaw Min USDP former SPDC
    Ministry of Electric Power-2 Khin Maung Soe -
    Ministry of Science and Technology Aye Myint USDP former SPDC and Major General
    Ministry of President’s Office Soe Maung
    Thein Nyunt
    Kyaw Swa Khaing
    USDP
    USDP
    USDP
    former Lieutenant General, Judge

    Advocate General, and Military
    Judge General
    SPDC
    Ministry of Health Pe Thet Khin -
    Last edited by nelsonone; 21st October 2014 at 21:51.

  5. #5
    Senior Member nelsonone's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    2,862
    my 2/3rds majority comment was made thinking about the cabinet rather than the overall govt Kev...so sorry I didn't get the right handle in my first post there

    Take a look at the current cabinet I posted above....appointed in 2011....as you will see the vast majority (25 of 35) are either military, ex military and/or former members of the SPDC (State Peace and Development Council) which was the former government appointed by the junta

    so sorry Kev...I just don't buy into the myth that the junta/military is devolving its hold on the country..IMO its just window dressing to appease the western countries

    Cabinet of Burma - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    Last edited by nelsonone; 21st October 2014 at 21:52.

  6. #6
    K2
    K2 is offline
    Super Moderator K2's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    1,543
    Nels - sure the cabinet and MP's are predominantly military/former military or have close connections too - (we might a see similar situation here in due course).

    Read Thant Myint-U's 'Where China Meets India - Burma and the New Crossroads of Asia' - he's by far my favourite author and authority on Myanmar and I'll stick by my belief that at the very highest levels of the military and politicians (including Suu Kyi) are doing far more than appease western nations - much more to their concern is the rise of China and India and they know its only by real change (including politics) that they can become strong and secure enough to prevent Myanmar being overrun by its massive and powerful neighbours.
    Its My Life .....!

  7. #7
    Senior Member nelsonone's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    2,862
    yes Kev....unfortunately we may see something along these lines in our next "Govt" here...in fact the defacto (more like Gik 555) faux one set up at present reeks of it...and I see no reason to be optimistic about the new constitution currently being formulated by the military (and their appointees) here

    As I said to someone else recently about politicians....I take none of what I see seriously from them..Its actions not words that count...and often you can't even trust those
    K2 likes this.

  8. #8
    Senior Member nelsonone's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    2,862
    anyone see the love in between Obama and Su kyee yesterday.....looks like Obama is not so happy with the speed of the reforms and that Su Kyee has been sideline from the presidential elections by that dodgy law regarding association with foreigners

    ar/mashable.com/2014/11/14/myanm

    Obama meets Myanmar's Aung San Suu Kyi at home where she was kept under arrest

    16.5kSHARES
    Share on Facebook Share on Twitter



    WHAT'S THIS?


    U.S. President Barack Obama and Myanmar's opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi following the conclusion of their joint news conferenceIMAGE: PABLO MARTINEZ MONSIVAIS/ASSOCIATED PRESS
    BY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS20 hours ago
    President Barack Obama gave a blunt assessment Friday of the need for further reform in Myanmar's move toward democracy, weighing into sensitive controversies over the treatment of religious minorities and a prohibition keeping opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi from running for president.
    Suu Kyi, released four years ago from more than two decades of confinement, is now a member of Myanmar's Parliament but is unable to run in next year's presidential election because of a constitutional rule barring anyone with strong allegiances to a foreign national from standing for the presidency. Suu Kyi's sons are British, as was her late husband.
    SEE ALSO: Isolated for half a century, Myanmar is a struggling beauty

    "I don't understand a provision that would bar somebody from running for president because of who their children are," Obama said, with Suu Kyi by his side. "That doesn't make much sense to me."
    Obama and Suu Kyi took questions from reporters from the back patio of the house where she spent much of her time under house arrest. The two were warm and affectionate in their interactions, sharing a long embrace after their opening statements and joking with each other throughout their remarks.
    Obama has been pressing Myanmar's leaders to amend the Constitution, but has been careful to not directly endorse his fellow Nobel Peace Prize laureate as the country's next president. He also raised an issue that has led to criticism for the opposition icon — her reluctance to address the abuse of minority Rohingya Muslims who are deeply disdained by most people in Myanmar.
    "Discrimination against the Rohingya or any other religious minority I think does not express the kind of country that Burma over the long term wants to be," Obama said. "Ultimately that is destabilizing to a democracy." Myanmar is also known as Burma.
    Obama and Suu Kyi met briefly Thursday on the sidelines of a regional summit in the capital city of Naypyitaw. On Friday, Obama flew to the city of Yangon to hold more substantial talks with Suu Kyi and also toured the Secretariat Building, where Suu Kyi's father, independence hero Gen. Aung San, was assassinated by political rivals in 1947.
    Obama had broadly embraced Myanmar's move away from a half-century of military rule, suspending U.S. sanctions and rewarding the country with high-level visits from American officials. But Myanmar has stalled in fulfilling its promises of political and economic reforms, and in some cases has lost ground.

    "We shouldn't deny that Burma today is not the same as Burma five years ago," Obama said. "But the process is still incomplete."
    "We shouldn't deny that Burma today is not the same as Burma five years ago," Obama said. "But the process is still incomplete."Both Obama and Suu Kyi warned against complacency in the move toward democracy. Suu Kyi described the process as going through "a bumpy patch."
    Suu Kyi opened the press conference by addressing reports of tension between the U.S. and those working for democratic reforms in Myanmar. "We may view things differently from time to time but that will in no way affect our relationship," she said.
    Obama notably held his news conference on his visit to the Southeast Asian nation with Suu Kyi , not the country's president. Obama said he told President Thein Sein that he will be judging whether reforms are being fully realized first off by whether next year's election is held on time and whether the constitutional amendment process reflects inclusion.
    Suu Kyi said it's flattering to have a constitutional provision written with her in mind but it's not how the law should be written. The 69-year-old said she and her supporters are working to change it and welcome Obama's support.
    "The Constitution says all citizens should be treated as equals and this is discrimination on the grounds of my children," she said.

  9. #9
    K2
    K2 is offline
    Super Moderator K2's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    1,543
    Cosy love fest it may have been - but IF Suu Kyi ever does become president then the country she will have most trouble in countering such an obvious Americanophile positioning by her is China. It's quite a strong signal that Obama took time out pre-G20 to go to see Suu Kyi at all and his advisors must have warned him not to push hard on the Rohingya issue knowing it would detrimental to Suu Kyi domestic (Buddhist) support base.

    The most important meeting (far far as Myanmar's concerned) was Tien Sein's meeting with Chinese President Xi at APEC on Nov 8. I doubt Tien Sein would have been too delighted by Obama's media friendly love in with Suu Kyi, but at 69 she will need to position herself pretty soon if she has any hope of being an effective leader of Myanmar, perhaps the junta all too well is aware that her sons are the bigger threat in future as her family name is Myanmar's political dynasty.
    nelsonone likes this.
    Its My Life .....!

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •